Impressionism

Daniel Gerhartz - Fine Art Gallery
On the Fringe by Malcolm Liepke
Seated Nude by Malcolm Liepke
Mother and Child by Malcolm Liepke
Armonia by Jose Royo

Veil of Spring by Daniel Gerhartz - Oil on Canvas – 30” X 24” 1997 - Contact us for price

On the Fringe - Malcolm Liepke - – Oil on canvas 22” X 25” – 1996 - Contact us for Price

Seated Nude - Malcolm Liepke - Limited Edition Lithograph 248/275 - 27.5" X 20" - Contact for Price

Mother and Child by Malcolm Liepke - Limited Edition Lithograph - 24" X 18.5" - Contact for Price

Armonia - Royo - Limited Edition Serigraph 17/225 - Image size 15" X 22" - Contact for Price

 

Impressionism is an artistic style in which the artist captures the image of an object as someone would see it if they just caught a glimpse of it. They paint the pictures with a lot of color and many of their pictures are outdoor scenes.

Impressionists’ pictures are often very bright and vibrant. The artists like to capture their images without detail but with bold colors capturing more the essence of the image instead of the detail and therefore conveying the impression the artist got more than the reality as seen through the lens of a camera. Impressionism encompasses what its early adherents argued was a different way of seeing, it is an art of immediacy and movement, of candid poses and compositions, of the play of light expressed in a bright and varied use of color.

Impressionism had its formal beginning in 1874, when a group of Parisian artists, artistic radicals to say the least, who, in response to criticisms of their bold new artistic style, had recently formed the Cooperative and Anonymous Society of Painters, Sculptures and Engravers (Société Anonyme Coopérative des Artistes Peintres, Sculpteurs, Graveurs) and mounted an exhibit at the studio of photographer/journalist Felix Nadar. Among this group of radicals were Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Camille Pissarro, and a handful of others who had organized the group during the latter part of 1873 and were subsequently joined by Paul Cezanne, Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley and Berthe Morisot among the noted artists of the time. A total of 30 artists participated in the exhibit. They exhibited together eight times between 1874 and 1886.

Encompassing what its adherents argued was a different way of seeing, it is an art of immediacy and movement, of candid poses and compositions, of the play of light expressed in a bright and varied use of colour.

Despite its resistance among the artistic “elites” of their day, Impressionism grew rapidly in favor among art lovers and today Impressionism still continues to be a favorite among many art aficionados including this author.

 

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